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International Journal of Logistics
Research and Applications

Better Reverse Logistics for Low Carbon Economy
Deadline: 1st January 2022

Guest editors

  • Prof Yu Xiong (Lead Guest Editor), Surrey Business School, University of Surrey, United Kingdom. Email: y.xiong@surrey.ac.uk

  • Prof Yu Zhou, School of Economics and Business Administration, Chongqing University, China. Email: zhouyu@cqu.edu.cn

  • Prof Darryl Newporter, Sustainability Research Institute, University of East London, United Kingdom. Email: D.J.Newport@uel.ac.uk

  • Prof Feng Yang, School of Management, University of Science and Technology of China, China. Email: fengyang@ustc.edu.cn

  • Prof Liping Qian, School of Economics and Business Administration, Chongqing University, China. Email: qlp@cqu.edu.cn

 

Overview of the Special Issue

 

A low carbon economy refers to an economy that aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, specifically carbon dioxide. It was first put forward in a white paper titled “Our Energy Future: Create Low-Carbon Economy” issued by the UK government in 2003.

The UK as the most positive initiator, promised in its “Climate Change Act” passed in 2008 to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 80% compared to 1990 levels by 2050. Later, in 2011, the European Commission adopted a roadmap for the European Union to effectively reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 80-95% of 1990 levels by 2050. Massive investments have been committed to strengthening the implementation of low-carbon strategies (Subramanian et al. 2007, Hong et al. 2017, Zhou et al. 2021). For example, The French government has a plan on greening the economy by investing one-third of its €100bn (£90bn) post-Covid economic stimulus.i Outside Europe, other countries are also taking action to promote a low carbon economy. The US officially rejoined the Paris Agreement on climate change in February 2021. The Chinese government declared that China, the largest producer of greenhouse gas, will reduce its overall emission after peaking in 2030, and achieve carbon neutrality by 2060.

These global policies and international climate agreements require firms in all industries to reduce carbon emissions substantially. The logistics industry has a critical role in the low-carbon transition. It has large energy consumption and carbon emissions. Boston Consulting Group reported that the logistics industry accounts for approximately 17% of all greenhouse gas emissions worldwide.ii Therefore, logistics, as a major contributor to carbon emissions, can make fully utilization of resources and environment protection in its links of transportation, packaging, and distribution to promote low-carbon economy. For example, DHL has adopted the global logistics emissions council framework to collect and share data on logistics carbon emissions.

According to the American Reverse Logistics Executive Council, reverse logistics is defined as “the process of planning, implementing, and controlling the efficient, cost-effective flow of raw materials, in-process inventory, finished goods and related information from the point of consumption to the point of origin for recapturing value or proper disposal”. Reverse Logistics combines the responsibilities of producers and consumers, saving substantial social resources and increasing the rate of resource utilization by recycling and reusing wastes (Jayaraman et al. 2008, Wu and Zhou 2017, Wang et al. 2019).

 

Reverse logistics can play a crucial part in the way business is done about the low-carbon transition. However, the existing literature focuses primarily on the economic benefits of reverse logistics. For example, Blackburn et al. (2004), Chan et al. (2010), and Abbey and Guide (2018) design and optimize reverse supply chains for commercial returns and profitable remanufacturing. How to balance the economic performance and the environmental performance of reverse logistics, especially for the sake of a low carbon economy, is still understudied. This special issue aims to seek high-quality, original papers that better understand the role of reverse logistics and its implications for a low carbon economy. We welcome all methodologies, especially multimethod and multidisciplinary articles.

This special issue invites research on following themes, but not limited to:

 

From a firm’s perspective:

  • How to effectively develop new technologies of low carbon reverse logistics?

  • How to collect and share the data on reverse logistics carbon emissions?

  • How to coordinate the reverse supply chain to reduce carbon emissions?

From a government’s perspective:

  • How to measure carbon emissions of reverse logistics?

  • How to develop a roadmap for carbon neutrality of reverse logistics?

  • How to design a mechanism for the adoption of low carbon reverse logistics? 

From a consumer’s perspective:

  • How to educate consumers on the benefits of low carbon reverse logistics?

  • How to induce consumers to engage in low carbon reverse logistics?

  • How to price low carbon reverse logistics under competition?

 

Publication Schedule

  • Full manuscript submission by: 1 January 2022.

  • Review process will begin once submission has been made.

  • Final manuscript decision: No more than 6 months after submission.

 

Submission Information

Manuscripts will be subject to a rigorous review process under the supervision of the Guest Editors and Editor-in-Chief, and accepted papers will be published online before print publication. Regarding the submission guidelines and other details, authors should refer to the details on the journal website.

Please make sure you select the SI you are submitting to when prompted in the submission portal.

Guest editors’ biography

  • Yu Xiong is a chair professor of Business Analytics in Surrey Business School and the associate dean international of Surrey University. His research focuses on sustainable and technological issues in global supply chains, where he has published in leading international journals, including European Journal of Operational Research, International Journal of Production Research, International Journal of Production Economics, and Omega – The International Journal of Management Science.

  • Yu Zhou is an associate professor in School of Economics and Business Administration, Chongqing University. His research interests focus on technology-intensive supply chain management. Her publications have appeared in journals such as Decision Sciences, European Journal of Operational Research, International Journal of Production Research, International Journal of Production Economics, and Omega – The International Journal of Management Science.

  • Darryl Newport is a professor and the director of the Sustainability Research Institute, University of East London. His research focuses on sustainable use of materials, resource efficiency and the circular economy. He has leaded a number of key research projects and has published more than 20 papers.

  • Feng Yang is a professor in School of Management, University of Science and Technology of China. His research interests include supply chain management, performance measurement, efficiency analysis, and data mining. He has published over 100 papers in journals such as European Journal of Operational Research, International Journal of Production Research, International Journal of Production Economics, Annals of Operations Research, and Energy Policy. He was the recipient of the National Science Fund for Excellent Young Scholars of China.

  • Liping Qian is a professor in School of Economics and Business Administration, Chongqing University. Her research interests focus on supply chain management and marketing channel management. Her publications have appeared in journals such as Industrial Marketing Management, and Asia Pacific Journal of Management.

References

  • Abbey, J. D., V. D. R. Guide (2018). A typology of remanufacturing in closed-loop supply chains. International Journal of Production Research 56(1-2): 374-384.

  • Blackburn, J. D., V. D. R. Guide, G. C. Souza, L. N. Van Wassenhove (2004). Reverse Supply Chains for Commercial Returns. California Management Review 46(2): 6-22.

  • Chan, H. K., S. Yin, F. T. S. Chan (2010). Implementing Just-In-Time Philosophy to Reverse Logistics Systems: A Review. International Journal of Production Research 48(21): 6293-6313.

  • Hong, Z., C. Chu, L. L. Zhang, Y. Yu (2017). Optimizing an emission trading scheme for local governments: A Stackelberg game model and hybrid algorithm. International Journal of Production Economics 193: 172-182.

  • Jayaraman, V., A. D. Ross, A. Agarwal (2008). Role of information technology and collaboration in reverse logistics supply chains. International Journal of Logistics Research and Applications 11(6): 409-425.

  • Subramanian, R., S. Gupta, B. Talbot (2007). Compliance Strategies under Permits for Emissions. Production and Operations Management 16(6): 763-779.

  • Wang, N., Q. He, B. Jiang (2019). Hybrid closed-loop supply chains with competition in recycling and product markets. International Journal of Production Economics 217: 246-258.

  • Wu, X., Y. Zhou (2017). The optimal reverse channel choice under supply chain competition. European Journal of Operational Research 259(1): 63-66.

  • Zhou, X., X. Wei, J. Lin, X. Tian, B. Lev, S. Wang (2021). Supply chain management under carbon taxes: A review and bibliometric analysis. Omega – The International Journal of Management Science 98: 102295.

i) https://www.theguardian.com/guardian-green-jobs/2020/oct/19/what-are-green-jobs-and-why-are-they-important

ii) https://www.bcg.com/publications/2020/climate-action-pays-off-in-transportation-and-logistics